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Protecting against misuse:

Resources and information for using Life360 safely.

Each family is unique, and may use Life360 differently. Our features are designed to bring families closer, foster trust, and offer peace of mind.

Because your privacy and security matter, we have compiled best practices, specialist guidance, and legal resources to help you understand your rights.

This page will help point you in the right direction if you feel you have been harmed by another user. Since laws vary significantly by state and jurisdiction, you can find the most precise information through an online search that includes: your city and state, details of the harm you’ve experienced, and that you’re looking for a legal resource.

Using Life360 as a family

Advanced Location Sharing empowers effortless coordination throughout the day, when used properly. To ensure that your family is using Life360 in a healthy, productive way, here are suggested best practices from the Life360 Family Expert and registered family psychologist, Dr. Vanessa Lapointe.

Best practices for families:

  • Have honest and transparent conversations on how the technology will be used. Important questions to talk through include:
Q: As a family, for what reason(s) are we using Life360?
Q: What are the expectations around when Location Sharing is turned on or off?
Q: How often do we plan to use Life360 to check the other’s location?
Q:
How will Location Sharing help us feel more connected as a family?
  • Be open about using Location Sharing to foster continued trust within your relationships.
  • Use Location Sharing as a protective tool to ensure the best for your kids, rather than having it imposed as a consequence.

Understanding app misuse

Review this section if you’re concerned that a Circle member is misusing Life360 in a way that crosses a legal or ethical boundary.

How do I know if I’ve been a victim of stalking?

Legal standards may differ depending on where you live. California law defines a stalker as a person who willfully, maliciously, and repeatedly follows and/or harasses another person, and who makes a credible threat intended to make that person fear for their safety or the safety of their family.

Since laws can vary significantly by state and jurisdiction, get the most precise information for your location through an online search that includes: your city and state, the harm you’ve experienced, and that you’re looking for a legal resource.

Breaking down the terms:
(Please note that these definitions are specific to California. Check your local legal resources for more information.)

“Harasses” means that someone is knowingly and willfully annoying, tormenting, seriously alarming, or terrorizing another person without a legitimate purpose.

“Course of conduct” means that this action or behavior happens repeatedly — at least twice — within a period of time, showing continuity of purpose. This doesn’t include constitutionally protected activity.

“Credible threat” means a verbal or written threat (this includes electronic communication), or a threat that’s implied by a pattern of conduct. A credible threat can also be a combination of statements and conduct.

  • A credible threat is intended to make the target fear for their safety or the safety of their family, made with the apparent ability to carry out the threat. This doesn’t include constitutionally protected activity.

“Electronic communication device” includes, but is not limited to, telephones, cellular phones, computers, video recorders, fax machines, or pagers.

How do I know if I’ve been a victim of abuse or harassment?

Since laws vary significantly by state and jurisdiction, get the most precise information for your location through an online search that includes: your city and state, the harm you’ve experienced, and that you’re looking for a legal resource.

Here are examples of how California recognizes different types of harassment:

Civil Harassment: Includes assault, battery, stalking, and threatening violence.

  • The threat of violence must be credible enough that a reasonable person would be afraid for their safety or the safety of their family.

Criminal Harassment: In California, it’s illegal to willfully threaten to commit a crime which will result in death or serious physical injury to another person.

Who can I call for help?

If you’re concerned for your safety or a family member’s safety, call the police, authorities, or a help hotline (see below for a full list of resources). If possible, consult with an attorney in your area, because laws vary significantly by state and jurisdiction.

Searching for an attorney:
Attorneys specialize in different areas of legal practice. If you’re performing a search online, include: your city and state, details of the harm you have experienced, and that you are looking for an attorney.

Support for minors

We take the protection of vulnerable family members very seriously. If you’re under the age of 18 and concerned for your safety, here is some guidance around getting help.

As a minor, who should I call for help? What legal actions or measures can I take?

When to speak up and find help:
If you feel unsafe, don’t keep it to yourself — even though an adult may ask you to. If you’re not sure, talk to someone. Help is available and you’re not alone. See the full list of resources below for support.

If you’re concerned for your safety, call the police, authorities, or a help hotline (see below for a full list of resources). If possible, consult with an attorney in your area, because laws vary significantly by state and jurisdiction.

Searching for an attorney:
Attorneys specialize in different areas of legal practice. If you’re performing a search online, include: your city and state, details of the harm you have experienced, and that you are looking for an attorney.

Additional resources

Organizations that specifically offer support for minors are notated with an asterisk.

Victims of Crime Stalking Resource Center

Phone: 1 (202) 467-8700
Email: info@victimsofcrime.org

The National Center for Victims of Crime’s Stalking Resource Center offers a variety of information related to stalking, including information on stalking laws, safety planning, and other resources.

National Domestic Violence Hotline

24-Hour Hotline: 1 (800) 799-7233
Available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week via phone and online chat.

The National Domestic Violence Hotline is available for anyone experiencing domestic violence, seeking resources or information, or questioning unhealthy aspects of their relationship.

* National Safe Place

If you’re in trouble or need help, text SAFE and your current location (address, city, state) to 4HELP (44357)

Safe Place provides access to immediate help and supportive resources for youth in need. As a community initiative, the program designates schools, fire stations, libraries, and other youth-friendly organizations as Safe Place locations, which display the yellow and black sign. Safe Place locations extend the doors of the local youth service agency or shelter to support teens in crisis situations, creating a safety net for youth.

* The Trevor Project

24-Hour Hotline: 1 (866) 488-7386
Live Chat with the Trevor Project (Fridays 4:00pm to 5:00pm EST)

The Trevor Project is the leading national organization providing crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer & questioning (LGBTQ) young people under 25.

* Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline

24-Hour Hotline: 1 (800) 422-4453
Available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week via phone and text.

The Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline is dedicated to the prevention of child abuse. Serving the U.S. and Canada, the hotline is staffed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week with professional crisis counselors who — through interpreters — provide assistance in over 170 languages. The hotline offers crisis intervention, information, and referrals to thousands of emergency, social service, and support resources. All calls are confidential.

* The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children

24-Hour Hotline: 1 (800) 843-5678
Phone: 1 (703) 224-2150

As the nation’s clearinghouse and comprehensive reporting center for all issues related to the prevention of and recovery from child victimization, NCMEC leads the fight against abduction, abuse, and exploitation — because every child deserves a safe childhood.

Crisis Text Line

Text HOME to 741741
Available 24/7

Text HOME to 741741 from anywhere in the United States, anytime, about any type of crisis. A live, trained Crisis Counselor receives the text and responds, all from our secure online platform. The volunteer Crisis Counselor will help you move from a hot moment to a cool moment.

The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI)

Hotline: 1 (800) 950-NAMI (6264)
Monday through Friday from 10:00am to 6:00pm EST.
Email: info@nami.org

The NAMI HelpLine is a free, nationwide peer-support service providing information, resource referrals and support to people living with mental health conditions, their family members and caregivers, mental health providers and the public. HelpLine staff and volunteers are experienced, well-trained, and able to provide guidance.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

24-Hour Hotline: 1 (800) 273-8255
Available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week via phone and online chat.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline provides free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals.

This Member Protection Resources Page and its contents do not, and are not intended to, constitute legal advice; they are for general informational purposes only. This Member Protection Resources Page contains links to other third-party websites. These links are only for your convenience and Life360 does not recommend or endorse the contents of these third-party websites. You are solely responsible for any action you may or may not take based on the contents of this Member Protection Resources Page, and by accessing this Member Protection Resources Page you agree that any liability of Life360 is expressly disclaimed. The information on this Member Protection Resources Page is provided "as is," and Life360 makes no representations or warranties that the information is accurate or up-to-date. Please contact an attorney within your jurisdiction for advice on a particular legal matter. By accessing this Member Protection Resources Page, you agree that you should not act or refrain from acting on the basis of the information contained herein. Any use of this Member Protection Resources Page or its contents do not create any fiduciary relationship between you and Life360.